Trainspotting: Irvine Welsh

‘Choose us. Choose life. Choose mortgage payments; choose washing machines; choose cars; choose sitting oan a couch watching mind-numbing and spirit-crushing game shows, stuffing fuckin junk food intae yir mooth. Choose rotting away, pishing and shiteing yersel in a home, a total fuckin embarrassment tae the selfish, fucked-up brats ye’ve produced. Choose life.’

So. I watched Trainspotting, the 1996 film, a couple of weeks ago and fully enjoyed it. So much so, that I went out and bought the book. Obviously, it is one of those things that has been everywhere at the moment, what with T2 Trainspotting coming out at the beginning of this year (might I add that the book sequel is actually called Porno). I have read an Irvine Welsh novel before, Filth, and found it thoroughly enjoyable – aside from the graphic violence, twisted narrative and phonetic Scottish writing.

Trainspotting is set in Leith, Edinburgh, following Mark Renton and his friends in their social interactions and encounters with heroin. The book documents Renton’s attempts to quit the drug, and all of those who cross his path, often being sucked into his orbit. It is made up of various monologues, not only those of Renton, yet also those surrounding him – giving insight into all aspects of Leith’s drug crowd. The book was begun from several short stories Welsh wrote, giving Trainspotting a more bizarre feeling in its non-linear approach. As Renton tries to rise above his friends, many of them spiral into the lives addiction has chosen for them. It is all very powerful stuff.

Again, obviously the writing style, being a mixture of Scottish, Scotch English and just plain English can make the reading a little difficult, yet it is definitely worth sticking to. If you are somebody who has watched the film, I would definitely recommend reading this – they are both complimentary but very different entities. Some great characters are missing from the film. Most of all, Trainspotting offers an intriguing perspective on addicting and its effects on character. Renton is the classic anti-hero, but the potential of him and his friends, wasted in their situations – making him someone the reader can emphasise with.

This is a definite recommend to a friend, especially if they have only seen the film.

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